Category Archives: Business Identity

What Happens When Wedding Pros Stop Marketing?

What happens when you stop marketing?

Advertisingstop

Your company has reached the point where you no longer feel the need to advertise. You have stopped all print, quit doing bridal shows, maybe you’re not even active in social networking any more. You still have a website and that’s all you really need, post a blog here and there and sit back and work the events your venues send you. All’s good right?

Right, you have plenty of business for now. However in the wedding business we are constantly dealing with a completely new group of brides year after year. Referrals will come in for a while but as newer companies market themselves the brides hear about them and not you. In just a few years your excellent branding you may have built up can fade away. It is totally possible that new brides may have never heard of you.

Not advertising this season can mean a year from now you won’t have as many weddings as you have now.

Anyone might want to take a break from time to time, but be careful how long you keep out of the limelight.

Sometimes, the idea of not marketing can be contagious. When you mimic the decision of fellow professionals, are you doing what is best for your company? The people who work at venues come and go, preferred vendor lists can change at the drop of a hat. It’s never wise to put all you eggs in one basket.

To insure that your brand keeps on growing the way you want, stay active! Keep your name and company in the forefront of other vendors and the brides by participating in quality bridal shows, keep a print presence in wedding magazines and on wedding websites. If you pull back too much and are out of site and out of mind beyond your small referring group of friends, you will no longer exist to new brides and newer pros.

Perhaps you feel you can get all the business you want from the venues that refer you, however if all professionals feel that way and only venues do the advertising and exhibiting at shows, shows will cease to exist as they need the variety to fulfil the brides expectations when they attend shows.

You might call it the “circle of life” for weddings. If we all don’t work together to make the wedding planning experience what the brides want and need, the face of the industry will soon change in a way that none of us will like.

Think about the things you did that got you to where you are today…..if you stop doing them will there be a negative impact on your business down the road?

stopadvertisingimagesIt’s not too late to book a marketing package with Bridal Spectacular Events, reaching brides through bridal shows, print and web.

Facebook Updates Protocol

Facebook status updateFacebook doesn’t share your status updates with 100% percent of your friends anymore. It’s generally less than 20%, and yet we often do even more damage to our own visibility… particularly, those of us who use our personal pages for both business and personal messages.

Here’s a list of considerations you should riffle through, before making your next Facebook status update.

  1. What’s the reason for your update? – Is it humor? Are you sharing important information for life? Nobody cares where you ate for lunch or what you ordered… nor do want a picture of it. Unless it is the most incredible and beautiful concoction you’ve ever seen or tasted, AND you have the recipe handy, it’s a non-starter.
  2. How many times have you updated, today? – If it’s more than a handful of times, then you’re not really cut out for Facebook. You’re more of a Twitter user. Likely you have a Twitter account… maybe it’s time to use it.
  3. Who are your friends? Are they real friends, college buddies, business peers, clients, prospects, your 15-year old nephew. Do these people know that you dressed up like it’s halloween and danced on a table top?  Not everybody needs to know your go-go/costume tendencies.
  4. Don’t ask for emotional support with explaining what it’s all about? Matter of fact, don’t ask everyone who’s a friend to read your most public thoughts. Better idea… call a good friend and hear a human voice.
  5. Are you just thinking out loud? If another person posted the same update, would you snicker?
  6. Do you REALLY think that all your friends need to hear about your Facebook game addiction? Color most of them: Not interested!
  7. Your guilty pleasure may sound ludicrous to the masses. Even posting about a hip/happening TV show is a bad idea if you’re in a different time zone… you become a spoiler. Stick to live national events, such as the Super Bowl.

Random musings are risky business. Those are for your private journal, not public view. Every post should have a purpose.

People judge our communications all the time. People don’t have to unfriend you to make you go away. They can just mute your news feed.

Proceed with caution…

Andy Ebon

Andy Ebon
Wedding Marketing Expert
The Wedding Marketing Blog

Is your business a brand or commodity?

Corn is acommodity

Corn is a commodity

Here’s a hint… This is a trick question. I’m not really asking for your perception of your business.

An assessment of one’s own business is quite difficult. All of us suffer from The Curse of Knowledge. We cannot forget what we know, or believe, about our business.

The real issue is: What does the prospect know (or think they know) about your business or its category (photographer, baker, florist, disc jockey, etc.,)?

We may believe in ourselves and see our business as unique, special, or decidedly different. Prospects or peers in the wedding industry  (or some percentage thereof) may see us as similar to others in our category. And that is  the definition of commodity. A generic choice, essentially the same as others, differentiated by price.

I leave you with these questions…

  • Does your work SCREAM distinctive differences from competitors? Differences that make it a better value, at profitable price, brides are willing to pay?
  • When one of your peers is asked for a referral, is your brand  top-of-mind? Can they articulate what makes your company and service standout?
  • Ask a few wedding industry peers what they think of, when they think of your product/service? Ask them to role-play what they would say, when recommending you to a bride. How’d they do?

Andy Ebon

Andy Ebon
Wedding Marketing Expert
The Wedding Marketing Blog